edgar

listen to the pronunciation of edgar
الإنجليزية - الإنجليزية
Electronic Data-Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval, a system that performs automated collection, validation, indexing, acceptance, and forwarding of submissions by companies and others who are required by law to file forms with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC")
A patronymic surname
A male given name

My father was the eldest of three sons, each of whom was given Adelia's idea of a high-toned name: Norval and Edgar and Percival, Arthurian revival with a hint of Wagner.

Adrian Edgar Douglas Bergen Edgar Edgar John Bergren Borah William Edgar Burroughs Edgar Rice Cayce Edgar Clurman Harold Edgar Degas Hilaire Germain Edgar Doctorow Edgar Laurence Duryea Charles Edgar and James Frank Edgar the Aetheling Guest Edgar Albert Harburg Edgar Yipsel Hoover John Edgar Masters Edgar Lee Poe Edgar Allan Stanley Francis Edgar and Stanley Freelan O. Thomson John Edgar Wallace Richard Horatio Edgar Wideman John Edgar Cecil of Chelwood Edgar Algernon Robert Gascoyne Cecil 1st Viscount
{i} man's name
given name, male, from Old English
the younger brother of Edwy who became king of Northumbria when it renounced Edwy; on Edwy's death he succeeded to the throne of England (944-975)
Education Department General Administrative Regulations
The Securities & Exchange Commission uses Electronic Data Gathering and Retrieval to transmit company documents such as 10-Ks, 10-Qs, quarterly reports, and other SEC filings, to investors
Administrative regulations governing the Department's discretionary grant and cooperative agreement programs found in Parts 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85, and 86 of Title 34 of the CFR (defined above); a document issued by the Department that contains a reprint of these regulations
or Edgardo Master of Ravenswood, in love with Lucy Ashton (Lucia di Lammermoor) While absent in France on an important embassy, the lady is led to believe that her lover has proved faithless to her, and in the torrent of her indignation consents to marry the laird of Bucklaw, but stabs him on the wedding-night, goes mad, and dies In the opera Edgardo stabs himself also; but in the novel he is lost in the quicksands at Kelpies-Flow, in accordance with an ancient prophecy (Donizetti's opera of "Lucia di Lammermoor"; Sir Walter Scott's "Bride of Lammermoor "
Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval System A database available over the Internet that gives investors free and easy access to disclosure documents that publicly traded companies must file with the Securities and Exchange Commission (S E C)
Stands for Electronic Data Gathering Analysis and Retrieval EDGAR Online is a private commercial service that gives the professional and individual users electronic access to the critical business, financial and competitive details of every U S public company that is required to disclose of its activities to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
Established by the SEC, this is the system used by companies and mutual funds to file documents electronically It is significant to individual investors, because you can directly access the EDGAR filing room on the Internet and retrieve IPO prospectuses, annual reports and quarterly filings for free
Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval
The Electronic data gathering and retrieval system used by the sec to transmit company documents to investors Those documents, which are available via dbc's smart edgar service, include 10qs, 8ks (significant developments such as the sale of a company division or business unit) and 13ds (disclosures by parties who own 5 percent or more of the company's shares)
Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis and Retrieval System - The Securities and Exchange commission's system for the electronic submission by direct transmission, magnetic tape or diskette, of most filings and related correspondence
Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval (EDGAR)--An electronic system developed by the Securities and Exchange Commission EDGAR permits companies to file electronically with the SEC all documents required for securities offerings and ongoing disclosure obligations EDGAR became fully operational mid-1995 (See Securities and Exchange Commission)
The SEC database which houses 10Q and 10K filings of public companies Annual reports can be accessed on line
US Dept of Education general administrative regulations for grants and contracts Effort Reports Federally required certification of effort expended on all sponsored agreements both Federal and Nonfederal
Electronic archive of company filings with the SEC
Acronym for Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval The Securities and Exchange Commission's electronic system used by all publicly-traded companies to transmit required filings to the SEC The SEC provides a free EDGAR; other companies provide their own EDGAR services that include additional information and search capabilities
Electronic Data Gathering and Retrieval The Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) uses EDGAR to transmit company documents such as 10-Ks, 10-Qs, quarterly reports, and other SEC filings, to investors
The Securities & Exchange Commission uses Electronic Data Gathering and Retrieval to transmit company documents to investors Those documents, which are available via DBC's Smart Edgar service, include 10-Qs (quarterly reports), 8-Ks (significant developments such as the sale of a company unit) and 13-Ds (disclosures by parties who own 5% or more of a company's shares)
Administrative regulations governing U S Department of Education grants and cooperative agreements EDGAR include's DED's implementation of A-110, including all approved deviations
Edgar Albert Guest
born Aug. 20, 1881, Birmingham, Warwickshire, Eng. died Aug. 5, 1959, Detroit, Mich., U.S. British-born U.S. writer. His family immigrated to the U.S. when he was 10 years old. He became an office boy for the Detroit Free Press and later a reporter and writer of daily sentimental rhymes. These became so popular that they were syndicated throughout the country. His first book, A Heap o' Livin' (1916), became a best-seller and was followed by similar collections of optimistic verse on such subjects as home, mother, and the virtue of hard work
Edgar Algernon Robert Gascoyne-Cecil 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood
born Sept. 14, 1864, London, Eng. died Nov. 24, 1958, Tunbridge Wells, Kent British statesman. The son of the marquess of Salisbury, he served during World War I as minister of blockade and as assistant secretary of state for foreign affairs. He was one of the principal draftsmen of the League of Nations covenant in 1919 and, as president of the League of Nations Union (1923-45), one of the League's most loyal workers until it was superseded by the United Nations. In 1937 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize
Edgar Allan Poe
His works are famous for his cultivation of mystery and the macabre. Among his tales are "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Masque of the Red Death," "The Black Cat," "The Tell-Tale Heart," and "The Pit and the Pendulum." "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" and "The Purloined Letter" initiated the modern detective story. His poems (less highly regarded now than formerly) are musical and sensuous, as in "The Bells," a showcase of sound effects; they include touching lyrics inspired by women (e.g., "Annabel Lee") and the uncanny (e.g., "The Raven")
Edgar Allan Poe
a US poet and writer of short stories. He is most famous for his strange, frightening stories about death and evil powers such as The Fall of the House of Usher. Another story, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, was one of the first detective stories. His most famous poem is The Raven (1809-49). born Jan. 19, 1809, Boston, Mass., U.S. died Oct. 7, 1849, Baltimore, Md. U.S. poet, critic, and short-story writer. Poe was raised by foster parents in Richmond, Va., following his mother's death in 1811. He briefly attended the University of Virginia and then returned to Boston, where in 1827 he published a pamphlet of youthful, Byronic poems. By 1835 he was in Richmond as editor of the Southern Literary Messenger, the first of several periodicals he was to edit or write for. There he married a 13-year-old cousin, who died in 1847. At various times he lived in Baltimore, New York, and Philadelphia. Alcohol, the bane of his irregular and eccentric life, caused his death at age
Edgar Allan Poe
(1809-1849) U.S. poet and writer of short stories
Edgar Bergen
orig. Edgar John Bergren born Feb. 16, 1903, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died Sept. 30, 1978, Las Vegas, Nev. U.S. comedian and ventriloquist. As a boy he developed the skill in ventriloquism that he later used to earn his tuition at Northwestern University. After stints in vaudeville and nightclubs, he took his act to radio, where the Edgar Bergen-Charlie McCarthy Show (with his caustic and irrepressible dummy Charlie McCarthy) was one of the most popular programs for 20 years (1937-57). His daughter, Candice (b. 1946), was a successful screen and television actress
Edgar Cayce
born March 18, 1877, near Hopkinsville, Ky., U.S. died Jan. 3, 1945, Virginia Beach, Va. U.S. faith healer. He received little formal education. He began his cures in the 1920s, often accomplishing them long-distance. In 1925 he settled in Virginia Beach, Va., where he established a hospital (1928) and the Association for Research and Enlightenment (1931). He also made prophecies (including of the destruction of New York City and California) and claimed to be able to recall past lives. He believed in the existence of a great civilization in Atlantis some 12,000 years ago
Edgar D Tillyer
(1881-1973) American optical scientist and inventor who held more than 150 patents on lenses and optical devices
Edgar Degas
{i} (1834-1917) French painter and sculptor famous for his portrayal of scenes from everyday life
Edgar Degas
a French Impressionist painter, known especially for his pictures of horse racing, theatres, cafés, and women dancing (1834-1917). born July 19, 1834, Paris, France died Sept. 27, 1917, Paris French painter, graphic artist, and sculptor. The son of a wealthy banker, he entered the École des Beaux-Arts in 1855. He spent much time in Italy studying and copying the Old Masters and became a skilled draftsman, producing history paintings and portraits. In the 1860s he was introduced to Impressionism by Édouard Manet and gave up his academic aspirations, turning for his subject matter to the fast-moving city life of Paris, particularly the ballet, theatre, circus, racetrack, and cafés. Influenced by Japanese prints and the new medium of photography, he used displaced figure groupings and unfamiliar perspective to create figure groups seen informally and in movement, similar in effect to snapshots. His fascination with the ballet and the racetrack sprang from his interest in picturing people absorbed in the practiced movements of their occupations. He often worked in pastel, his favourite medium, producing series of women, bathers, ballerinas, and horse races. From 1880 he modeled wax figures, which were cast in bronze after his death. He was the first of the Impressionists to achieve recognition
Edgar Douglas Adrian
later 1st Baron Adrian of Cambridge born Nov. 30, 1889, London, Eng. died Aug. 4, 1977, London British electrophysiologist. He amplified electrical potential variations in nerve impulses from sense organs to record ever smaller changes, eventually recording impulses from single sensory endings and motor nerve fibres. His work clarified the physical basis of sensation and the mechanism of muscular control. Adrian's later studies of brain electrical activity included investigations into epilepsy and the location of cerebral lesions. He shared a 1932 Nobel Prize with Charles Sherrington
Edgar Guest
born Aug. 20, 1881, Birmingham, Warwickshire, Eng. died Aug. 5, 1959, Detroit, Mich., U.S. British-born U.S. writer. His family immigrated to the U.S. when he was 10 years old. He became an office boy for the Detroit Free Press and later a reporter and writer of daily sentimental rhymes. These became so popular that they were syndicated throughout the country. His first book, A Heap o' Livin' (1916), became a best-seller and was followed by similar collections of optimistic verse on such subjects as home, mother, and the virtue of hard work
Edgar Laurence Doctorow
born Jan. 6, 1931, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. novelist. Doctorow worked as an editor and has since taught at colleges and universities. His best-selling novels have often focused on the working class and the dispossessed of earlier decades in the U.S. The Book of Daniel (1971) concerned the Rosenberg spy case. Ragtime (1975; film, 1981) incorporates actual early 20th-century American figures. Loon Lake (1980), World's Fair (1985), and Billy Bathgate (1989; film, 1991) examine the Great Depression and its aftermath. City of God (2000), concerns the efforts of a New York City Episcopal minister to renew his faith
Edgar Lee Masters
born Aug. 23, 1869, Garnett, Kan., U.S. died March 5, 1950, Philadelphia, Pa. U.S. poet and novelist. He grew up on his grandfather's farm and became a lawyer in Chicago. He wrote undistinguished poetry and plays before publishing Spoon River Anthology (1915), his major work. Its 245 free-verse epitaphs in the form of monologues are spoken from the grave by the former inhabitants of a fictitious small town, who tell of their bitter, unfulfilled lives in its dreary confines
Edgar Rice Burroughs
{i} (1875-1950) USA author, writer of "Tarzan
Edgar Rice Burroughs
a US writer, known for his stories about Tarzan (1875-1950). born Sept. 1, 1875, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died March 19, 1950, Encino, Calif. U.S. novelist. Burroughs worked as an advertising copywriter before trying fiction. His jungle adventure novel Tarzan of the Apes (1914) became the first of 25 books featuring Tarzan, the son of an English nobleman abandoned in Africa and raised by apes. He wrote 43 other novels
Edgar Wallace
born April 1, 1875, Greenwich, London, Eng. died Feb. 10, 1932, Hollywood, Calif., U.S. British novelist, playwright, and journalist. He held odd jobs, served in the army, and was a reporter before producing his first success, The Four Just Men (1905). With works such as Sanders of the River (1911), The Crimson Circle (1922), The Flying Squad (1928), and The Terror (1930), he virtually invented the modern "thriller"; the plots of his detective and suspense stories are complex but clearly developed, and they are known for their exciting climaxes. His output (including 175 books) was prodigious and his rate of production so great as to be the subject of humour. His literary reputation has suffered since his death
Edgar Yipsel Harburg
orig. Isidore Hochberg born April 8, 1896/98, New York, N.Y., U.S. died March 5, 1981, Hollywood, Calif. U.S. lyricist, producer, and director. "Yip" Harburg attended The City College of New York with his friend Ira Gershwin. When his electrical-appliance business went bankrupt in 1929, he devoted himself to songwriting for Broadway, composing songs such as the Depression anthem "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" (with Jay Gorney). From 1935 Harburg and Harold Arlen wrote songs for many films, notably The Wizard of Oz (1939). Blacklisted from films for his political views, Harburg returned to Broadway to write musicals, notably Finian's Rainbow (1947; with Burton Lane). Among his best-known songs are "April in Paris," "It's Only a Paper Moon," and "Over the Rainbow
Edgar de Wahl
{i} Edgar von Wahl (1867-1948 ), Estonian (of ethnic Baltic German origin) teacher who invented the Interlingue (Occidental language)
Edgar the Aetheling
born , Hungary died 1125 Anglo-Saxon prince. He was proposed as king of England after the Battle of Hastings (1066) but instead served the Norman kings William I (the Conqueror) and William II. Rebellions in favour of the aetheling (prince) continued in England until 1069. Edgar led the Norman force sent by William I to conquer Apulia in southern Italy (1086) but was deprived of his Norman lands by William II in 1091. In 1097, on William's orders, he overthrew Donald Bane, a Scottish king hostile to the Normans. About 1102 he went on a Crusade to the Holy Land. He later unsuccessfully supported Robert Curthose, duke of Normandy, against Henry I in the struggle for the English throne
Edgar von Wahl
{i} Edgar de Wahl (1867-1948 ), Estonian (of ethnic Baltic German origin) teacher who invented the Interlingue (Occidental language)
Charles Edgar and James Frank Duryea
born Dec. 15, 1861, Canton, Ill., U.S. died Sept. 28, 1938, Philadelphia, Pa. born Oct. 8, 1869, Washburn, Ill., U.S. died Feb. 15, 1967, Saybrook, Conn. U.S. automotive inventors. Charles initially worked as a bicycle mechanic. After seeing a gasoline engine at a state fair, he designed a gasoline-powered automobile, and in 1893 he and his brother Frank constructed the first U.S. automobile, which they drove successfully on the streets of Springfield, Mass. In Chicago in 1895, Frank drove an improved model to win the first U.S. auto race. In 1896 their company manufactured the first commercially produced U.S. automobiles; 13 cars were sold before the company failed and the brothers separated. Both started new automobile manufacturing ventures; Frank later developed the Stevens-Duryea limousine, which was produced into the 1920s
Francis Edgar; and Stanley Freelan O. Stanley
born June 1, 1849, Kingfield, Maine, U.S. died July 31, 1918, Ipswich, Mass. born June 1, 1849, Kingfield, Maine, U.S. died Oct. 2, 1940, Boston, Mass. U.S. inventors of the steam-driven automobile. In 1883 the twin brothers invented a dry-plate photographic process and conducted experiments with steam engines. In 1897 they built a steam-powered car, and in 1902 they established a company to manufacture their "Stanley Steamers." In 1906 they set a world record for the fastest mile, in 28.2 seconds. They retired in 1917; their company continued to manufacture cars until 1924, declining as gasoline-powered cars became easier to start and operate and steam cars became less popular
Harold Edgar Clurman
born Sept. 18, 1901, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 9, 1980, New York City U.S. director and drama critic. He was an actor from 1924 and was a founding member of the experimental Group Theatre. He directed a wide range of Broadway plays, including Awake and Sing! (1935), Member of the Wedding (1950), Touch of the Poet (1957), and Incident at Vichy (1965), and he wrote drama reviews for The New Republic (1949-53) and The Nation (1953-80)
Hilaire Germain Edgar Degas
{i} Edgar Degas (1834-1917), French painter and sculptor famous for his portrayal of scenes from everyday life
Hilaire-Germain- Edgar Degas
born July 19, 1834, Paris, France died Sept. 27, 1917, Paris French painter, graphic artist, and sculptor. The son of a wealthy banker, he entered the École des Beaux-Arts in 1855. He spent much time in Italy studying and copying the Old Masters and became a skilled draftsman, producing history paintings and portraits. In the 1860s he was introduced to Impressionism by Édouard Manet and gave up his academic aspirations, turning for his subject matter to the fast-moving city life of Paris, particularly the ballet, theatre, circus, racetrack, and cafés. Influenced by Japanese prints and the new medium of photography, he used displaced figure groupings and unfamiliar perspective to create figure groups seen informally and in movement, similar in effect to snapshots. His fascination with the ballet and the racetrack sprang from his interest in picturing people absorbed in the practiced movements of their occupations. He often worked in pastel, his favourite medium, producing series of women, bathers, ballerinas, and horse races. From 1880 he modeled wax figures, which were cast in bronze after his death. He was the first of the Impressionists to achieve recognition
J Edgar Hoover
born Jan. 1, 1895, Washington, D.C., U.S. died May 2, 1972, Washington, D.C. U.S. director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). He entered the Department of Justice as a file reviewer in 1917; two years later, as special assistant to Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer, he helped in the roundup and deportation of suspected Bolsheviks. In 1924 he was named director of the Bureau of Investigation, which he remade into a professional, merit-based organization. In the 1930s he successfully publicized the FBI's success in tracking down and capturing well-known criminals. During this time, both the FBI's size and its responsibilities grew steadily. In the late 1930s Hoover received authorization to investigate foreign espionage in the U.S. and the activities of communists and fascists alike. When the Cold War began in the late 1940s, the FBI undertook intensive surveillance of communists and other left-wing activists in the U.S. Hoover's animus toward radicals of every kind led him to investigate both the Ku Klux Klan and Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as other African American activists in the 1960s. At the same time, he maintained a hands-off policy toward the Mafia, which was allowed to conduct its operations nationwide practically free of FBI scrutiny or interference. Hoover habitually used the FBI's enormous surveillance and information-gathering powers to collect damaging information on politicians throughout the country, and apparently he was able to intimidate even sitting presidents by threatening to leak damaging disclosures about them. He retained his post for 48 years, until his death
J Edgar Thomson
born , Feb. 10, 1808, Springfield Township, Pa., U.S. died May 27, 1874, Philadelphia, Pa. U.S. civil engineer and railroad executive. He joined the Pennsylvania engineer corps at age
J Edgar Thomson
In 1847 he was hired as chief engineer of the newly incorporated Pennsylvania Railroad Co., which aimed to compete with trade lines to the west originating in New York and other eastern states. He became its president in 1852 and oversaw construction of a railway that crossed the Alleghenies without using inclined grades. Over the next 22 years, Thomson consolidated a network of lines from Philadelphia to Chicago, expanding the company's track from 250 to 6,000 mi (400-10,000 km)
J. Edgar Hoover
(1875-1972) director of the FBI credited with turning the bureau into an efficient and powerful agency (started a crime laboratory, fingerprint file, and police training programs)
J. Edgar Hoover
the most important director of the FBI, from 1924 until his death. He had very strong anti-Communist views, and he was later criticized for having too much power and for collecting information about people who were not criminals or enemies of the country (1895-1972)
John Edgar Hoover
born Jan. 1, 1895, Washington, D.C., U.S. died May 2, 1972, Washington, D.C. U.S. director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). He entered the Department of Justice as a file reviewer in 1917; two years later, as special assistant to Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer, he helped in the roundup and deportation of suspected Bolsheviks. In 1924 he was named director of the Bureau of Investigation, which he remade into a professional, merit-based organization. In the 1930s he successfully publicized the FBI's success in tracking down and capturing well-known criminals. During this time, both the FBI's size and its responsibilities grew steadily. In the late 1930s Hoover received authorization to investigate foreign espionage in the U.S. and the activities of communists and fascists alike. When the Cold War began in the late 1940s, the FBI undertook intensive surveillance of communists and other left-wing activists in the U.S. Hoover's animus toward radicals of every kind led him to investigate both the Ku Klux Klan and Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as other African American activists in the 1960s. At the same time, he maintained a hands-off policy toward the Mafia, which was allowed to conduct its operations nationwide practically free of FBI scrutiny or interference. Hoover habitually used the FBI's enormous surveillance and information-gathering powers to collect damaging information on politicians throughout the country, and apparently he was able to intimidate even sitting presidents by threatening to leak damaging disclosures about them. He retained his post for 48 years, until his death
John Edgar Thomson
born , Feb. 10, 1808, Springfield Township, Pa., U.S. died May 27, 1874, Philadelphia, Pa. U.S. civil engineer and railroad executive. He joined the Pennsylvania engineer corps at age
John Edgar Thomson
In 1847 he was hired as chief engineer of the newly incorporated Pennsylvania Railroad Co., which aimed to compete with trade lines to the west originating in New York and other eastern states. He became its president in 1852 and oversaw construction of a railway that crossed the Alleghenies without using inclined grades. Over the next 22 years, Thomson consolidated a network of lines from Philadelphia to Chicago, expanding the company's track from 250 to 6,000 mi (400-10,000 km)
John Edgar Wideman
born June 14, 1941, Washington, D.C., U.S. U.S. writer and educator. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania he became the second African American to receive a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford University. He published his first novel, A Glance Away, in 1967. His first work of nonfiction was the acclaimed Brothers and Keepers (1984), in which he examines his relationship with his brother, who is serving a life sentence in prison. He won PEN/Faulkner Awards for Sent for You Yesterday (1983) and Philadelphia Fire (1990), a fictional account of the bombing of the militant black group MOVE combined with an examination of his relationship with his son, now in prison
Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace
born April 1, 1875, Greenwich, London, Eng. died Feb. 10, 1932, Hollywood, Calif., U.S. British novelist, playwright, and journalist. He held odd jobs, served in the army, and was a reporter before producing his first success, The Four Just Men (1905). With works such as Sanders of the River (1911), The Crimson Circle (1922), The Flying Squad (1928), and The Terror (1930), he virtually invented the modern "thriller"; the plots of his detective and suspense stories are complex but clearly developed, and they are known for their exciting climaxes. His output (including 175 books) was prodigious and his rate of production so great as to be the subject of humour. His literary reputation has suffered since his death
William Edgar Borah
born June 29, 1865, Fairfield, Ill., U.S. died Jan. 19, 1940, Washington, D.C. U.S. senator (1907-40). He practiced law in Boise, Idaho, and in 1892 became the state's Republican Party chairman. In the Senate he wielded great power as chairman of the foreign relations committee from 1924. A champion of isolationism in foreign policy, he was best known for his role in preventing the U.S. from joining the League of Nations; he also opposed efforts to aid the Allies before the U.S. entered World War II. A maverick Republican, he supported many of the New Deal programs to relieve economic hardship and sponsored bills establishing the Department of Labor as well as the federal Children's Bureau
edgar

    الواصلة

    Ed·gar

    التركية النطق

    edgır

    النطق

    /ˈedgər/ /ˈɛdɡɜr/

    علم أصول الكلمات

    [ 'ed-g&r ] (noun.) 1947. From the name of early English kings, Old English ēad (“rich”) + gār (“spear”).

    كلمة اليوم

    calender
المفضلات