containment

listen to the pronunciation of containment
الإنجليزية - التركية
الإنجليزية - الإنجليزية
a physical system designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive or other dangerous materials from a nuclear reactor or industrial plant
a policy of checking the expansion of a hostile foreign power by creating alliances with other states; especially the foreign policy strategy of the United States in the early years of the Cold War
an inclusion
the act of containing or something contained
a doctrine developed after World War II based on the assumptions that the Soviet Union was an aggressor nation and that only a determined United States could block Soviet territorial ambitions
(physics) a system designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material from a reactor
The concept of regional eradication of communicable disease, first proposed by Soper in 1949 for the elimination of smallpox Containment of a world wide communicable disease demands a globally coordinated effort so that countries that have effected an interruption of transmission do not become reinfected following importation from neighboring endemic areas
the doctrine put forward by George F Kennan and adopted by the USA in March 1947 as the basis for its policy towards the USSR during the Cold War It involved providing assistance to any government threatened by "Communist Expansionism"
A composition technique for implementing COM objects It allows one object to reuse some or all of the interface implementations of one or more other objects The outer object acts as a client to the other objects, delegating implementation when it wishes to use the services of one of the contained objects Contrast with Aggregation
a policy of creating strategic alliances in order to check the expansion of a hostile power or ideology or to force it to negotiate pecefully; "containment of communist expansion was a central principle of United States' foreign policy from 1947 to the 1975"
an association in which one object instantiates the contained object (Making Objects - Slide 12)
U S Cold War foreign policy toward the Soviet Union, first articulated by George Kennan in 1947 with his famous "X" article in Foreign Affairs As originally articulated, the policy called for a vigilant but patient reaction to Soviet expansionism, emphasizing political and economic tools over military force
A spatial relationship that can be used in data query to select features that fall completely within specified features
Cisco EMF defines relationships between managed objects by use of containment, that is hierarchical trees of network elements See also MapObject Containment, Physical Containment, Containment Tree
(military) the act of containing something or someone; keeping it from spreading; "the army was charged with the containment of the rebel forces" (physics) a system designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material from a reactor a policy of creating strategic alliances in order to check the expansion of a hostile power or ideology or to force it to negotiate pecefully; "containment of communist expansion was a central principle of United States' foreign policy from 1947 to the1975
(physics) a system designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material from a reactor a policy of creating strategic alliances in order to check the expansion of a hostile power or ideology or to force it to negotiate pecefully; "containment of communist expansion was a central principle of United States' foreign policy from 1947 to the1975
The process of enclosing or containing hazardous substances in a structure, typically in ponds and lagoons, to prevent the migration of contaminants into the environment
The confinement of a biohazardous agent that is being cultured, stored, manipulated, transported or destroyed in order to prevent or limit its contact with people and/or the environment Methods used to achieve this include physical and biological barriers and inactivation using physical or chemical means
That which is contained; the extent; the substance
Actions taken to prevent further migration of a contaminant plume
The containment is defined as a vented, high leak rate containment which normally operates at lower than atmospheric pressure Any increase in pressure in the containment due to breaches in the Primary Pressure Boundary as caused by a range of design basis events is relieved by venting to atmosphere
(military) the act of containing something or someone; keeping it from spreading; "the army was charged with the containment of the rebel forces"
A window contains the pointer if the window is viewable and the hotspot of the cursor is within a visible region of the window or a visible region of one of its inferiors The border of the window is included as part of the window for containment The pointer is in a window if the window contains the pointer but no inferior contains the pointer
Containment is the action or policy of keeping another country's power or area of control within acceptable limits or boundaries
{i} act or policy of preventing the expansion of a hostile power
Achieving a level of control over a raw material, intermediate, or API that provides proper protection of these materials from external contamination and cross-contamination
Glass used in guarding situations designed to withstand specified loads and prevent people from falling
Most reactors are enclosed in a thick, concrete, domed building, called the containment In the event of a release of radioactive material into the reactor building, the containment traps the emissions and prevents their escape
The work area, usually a "dirty" sealed off from other "clean" areas
When an objects data section contains objects An object is built as an aggregate of objects
Safe methods for managing infectious agents in the laboratory environment where they are being handled or maintained The purpose of containment is to reduce or eliminate exposure of laboratory workers, other persons and the environment to potentially hazardous agents
The containment of something dangerous or unpleasant is the act or process of keeping it under control within a particular area or place. Fire crews are hoping they can achieve full containment of the fire before the winds pick up. = control. the act of keeping something under control, stopping it becoming more powerful etc. Strategic U.S. foreign policy of the late 1940s and early 1950s intended to check the expansionist designs of the Soviet Union through economic, military, diplomatic, and political means. It was conceived by George Kennan soon after World War II. An early application of containment was the Truman Doctrine (1947), which guaranteed U.S. aid to "free peoples" resisting "armed subjugation" by communist forces. See also Marshall Plan
cost containment
The method of preventing healthcare costs from increasing beyond a set level by controlling or reducing inefficiency and waste in the healthcare system
cost containment
The effort to reduce or hold down health care costs
cost containment
the attempt to control benefit costs by reducing the size of claims or minimizing administrative costs associated with benefit plans This approach is in contrast to cost shifting, which transfers costs to employees
cost containment
The controller reduction of inefficiencies in the consumption, allocation, or production of health care services that contribute to higher than necessary costs
cost containment
A broad term to describe a range of management actions, attitudes, and tools exercised by the sponsoring unit and/or its contractor, grantee or partner to reduce the costs of training The cost to be contained may be any direct or indirect trainee or training program cost Includes cost-sharing with the training provider, training contractor, host-country institution, or any other stakeholder
cost containment
this phrase became the watch word of the 80's as the cost of medical services rose so rapidly that buyers of insurance called for restrain of charges Efficiency and reduction of profits were the two main strategies to reduce contain costs Rationing of services was not openly practiced, but there are examples of denying medical service for the purpose of reducing costs
cost containment
A process that attempts to limit services that may drive up costs
cost containment
Plan activities or provisions aimed at holding down the cost of medical care or reducing the rate of its increase
cost containment
Reduction of inefficiencies in the consumption, allocation, or production of health care services Inefficiencies can occur when health services are used inappropriately; when health services could be delivered in less costly settings; and when the costs could be reduced by using a different combination of resources
cost containment
Provisions in a group medical plan aimed at holding down the cost of medical care Pre-certification, case management, and second surgical opinion are examples of cost containment provisions in a medical plan
cost containment
Control of inefficiencies in the consumption, allocation, or production of health care services that contribute to higher than necessary costs Inefficiencies are thought to exist in consumption when health services are inappropriately utilized; inefficiencies in allocation exist when health services could be delivered in less costly settings without loss of quality; and, inefficiencies in production exist when the costs of producing health services could be reduced by using a different combination of resources Cost containment is a word used in health care to describe most cost reduction activities by providers
cost containment
Features in a plan of benefits or in the administration of a plan designed to reduce or eliminate certain charges to the plan such as charges for unnecessary surgery or hospital days thus improving the plan's loss experience
cost containment
Strategies used to limit or control health care costs that do not sacrifice the quality of care
cost containment
Efforts or activities designed to reduce or slow down the cost increases of medical care services
cost containment
1 The firing of employees and/or the reduction of plant and equipment
cost containment
A set of strategies to reduce use of services and to encourage the substitution of more cost-effective services where appropriate Some people also consider it to include efforts to reduce the unit price of medical services
cost containment
Efforts by purchasers and by providers to control health care costs through mechanisms such as benefit design, pre-admission certification, pre-admission testing, and concurrent review programs; second opinion programs; discharge planning; claims audits, case management, and employee education
cost containment
Strategies used to limit or control costs Cost containment programs often include requirements by insurance companies for second opinions and pre-admission approvals for hospitalization Cost containment may also refer to policies developed nationally or statewide to slow the rising expenditures on health care
cost containment
Control of the overall cost of health-care services The term is often associated with medical management programs
cost containment
The process by which companies implement new programs or modify existing programs to continuously monitor costs so as to better manage the costs to their business In the case of pharmacy benefits, this usually refers to providing similar acting drugs at lower costs For example, switching to Allegra® from Claritin®
ring containment
a strategy of defense in cases of bioterrorism; vaccination only of people exposed and others who are incontact with them; "ring containment is a proven method of halting a smallpox epidemic
containment
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