chivalry

listen to the pronunciation of chivalry
الإنجليزية - التركية
şövalyelik

Şövalyelik çağı sona erdi. - The age of chivalry is gone.

yüreklilik
kibarlık
yiğitlik
incelik
şövalye

Şövalyelik çağı sona erdi. - The age of chivalry is gone.

kahramanlık
yiğitlik/şövalyelik
{i} cesaret
{i} mertlik
{i} yüreklilik, cesaret; cömertlik
{i} şövalyelik örgütü
{i} şövalyeler
şövalyelik makamı
nezaket
centilmenlik
الإنجليزية - الإنجليزية
The fact or condition of being a knight; knightly skill, prowess
Cavalry; horsemen armed for battle
Courteous behavior, especially that of men towards women
The ethical code of the knight prevalent in Medieval Europe, having such primary virtues as mercy towards the poor and oppressed, humility, honor, sacrifice, fear of God, faithfulness, courage and utmost graciousness and courtesy to ladies
the knightly system of feudal times with its code, usages and practices
{n} a species of muriatic earth mixed with iron
a person recognized by the King, Queen, and other Chivalry as one who possess prowess in heavy weapons combat and chivalric virtues
the system, spirit, or customs of medieval knighthood
Chivalry is polite, kind, and unselfish behaviour, especially by men towards women. Marie seemed to revel in his old-fashioned chivalry. = gallantry
The qualifications or character of knights, as valor, dexterity in arms, courtesy, etc
the spirit or character of the ideal knight
The dignity or system of knighthood; the spirit, usages, or manners of knighthood; the practice of knight-errantry
Exploit
The paladins of Charlemagne were all scattered by the battle of Roncesvallës The champions of Diderick were all assassinated at the instigation of Chriemhilda, the bride of Ezzel, King of the Huns The Knights of the Round Table were all extirpated by the fatal battle of Camlan Chivalry The six following clauses may be considered almost as axioms of the Arthurian romances: - (1) There was no braver or more noble king than Arthur (2) No fairer or more faithless wife than Guiniver (3) No truer pair of lovers than Tristan and Iseult (or Tristram and Ysolde) (4) No knight more faithful than Sir Kaye (5) None so brave and amorous as Sir Launcelot (6) None so virtuous as Sir Galahad The flower of Chivalry William Douglas, Lord of Liddesdale (Fourteenth century )
\'shiv-el-rè\ n pl -ries 1: a body of knights 2: the system or practices of knighthood 3: the spirit or character of the ideal knight
A body or order of cavaliers or knights serving on horseback; illustrious warriors, collectively; cavalry
Also called "The Chiv " A person recognized by the King, Queen, and other Chivalry as one who possesses prowess in heavy weapons combat and chivalric virtues A Knight swears fealty to the Crown, while a Master-of-Arms does not
An ethical code that was prevalent in Medieval Europe. It was the honor code of the knight
In the Middle Ages, chivalry was the set of rules and way of behaving which knights were expected to follow. the age of chivalry. Knightly class of feudal Europe, and especially the gallantry and honor expected of medieval knights. The ideal of courteous knightly conduct developed in the 12th-13th century. It arose out of feudal obligation (see feudalism) and stressed loyalty and obeisance by a knight to his God, his lord, and his lady, thus melding Christian and military virtues. Chivalry was greatly strengthened by the Crusades, a military endeavor on behalf of Christianity, which led to the founding of the earliest orders of chivalry, the Knights of Malta and the Templars. In addition to loyalty and honor, the chivalric virtues included valor, piety, courtesy, and chastity. Questions of love and honor were combined in the ethos of courtly love. The knight's lady was meant to be unobtainable, ensuring chastity; the feminine ideal thus became melded with the Virgin Mary. In the 14th-15th century, chivalry came to be associated increasingly with aristocratic display and public ceremony, particularly in jousting tournaments, rather than with service in the field
courtesy towards women
A tenure of lands by knight's service; that is, by the condition of a knight's performing service on horseback, or of performing some noble or military service to his lord
An elaborate code of ethics and behavior the evolved over the centuries governing the actions of knights both on and off the battlefield
the medieval principles of knighthood
The paladins of Charlemagne were all scattered by the battle of Roncesvallës The champions of Diderick were all assassinated at the instigation of Chriemhilda, the bride of Ezzel, King of the Huns The Knights of the Round Table were all extirpated by the fatal battle of Camlan Chivalry The six following clauses may be considered almost as axioms of the Arthurian romances: - (1) There was no braver or more noble king than Arthur (2) No fairer or more faithless wife than Guiniver (3) No truer pair of lovers than Tristan and Iseult (or Tristram and Ysolde) (4) No knight more faithful than Sir Kaye (5) None so brave and amorous as Sir Launcelot (6) None so virtuous as Sir Galahad The flower of Chivalry William Douglas, Lord of Liddesdale (Fourteenth century )
courtesy towards women the medieval principles of knighthood
{i} knight's code; gallantry, courtesy, loyalty, bravery
A code of behavior based on courtesy and honor Also used to indicate a Companion of the Order of the Chivalry, which is the Society level polling order for skill in armored combat Note that the Order of the Chivalry is comprised of Knights and Masters-at-Arms When a gentle is inducted into the order of the Chivalry, they must choose whether to swear fealty to the Crown Those that do so become Knights and those that don't become Masters-at-Arms
knighthood
age of chivalry
era of gallantry and codes of chivalry in the conduct of knights and nobles
chivalry

    الواصلة

    chiv·al·ry

    التركية النطق

    şîvılri

    المتضادة

    cowardice, fear, humbleness, humility

    النطق

    /ˈsʜəvəlrē/ /ˈʃɪvəlriː/

    علم أصول الكلمات

    [ shi-v&l-rE ] (noun.) 14th century. Middle English chivalrie, a late 13th century loan from Old French word chevalerie, "knighthood, chivalry, nobility, cavalry" (11th century), the -erie abstract of chevaler "knight, horseman", from Medieval Latin caballarius (“horseman, knight”), a derivation from caballus (“horse”). Medieval Latin caballaria (“knighthood, status or fief of a knight”) dates to the 12th century.

    كلمة اليوم

    motile
المفضلات