cecil

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English statesman who helped secure the throne for James I after the death of Elizabeth I (1603). British politician who was foreign minister under Benjamin Disraeli and prime minister (1885-1892 and 1895-1902). English statesman and chief adviser to Elizabeth I. He persuaded the queen to execute Mary Queen of Scots. Lawrence Cecil Adler Beaton Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Cecil Robert 1st earl of Salisbury Cecil William 1st Baron Burghley Day Lewis Cecil DeMille Cecil Blount Forester Cecil Scott Rhodes Cecil John Cecil Antonio Richardson Cecil of Chelwood Edgar Algernon Robert Gascoyne Cecil 1st Viscount Salisbury Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne Cecil 3rd marquess of
Cecil B DeMille
(1881-1959) Academy Award-winning American film director and producer, co-creator of the first feature film, director of "The Ten Commandments" (1956)
Cecil B DeMille
born Aug. 12, 1881, Ashfield, Mass., U.S. died Jan. 21, 1959, Hollywood, Calif. U.S. film director and producer. In 1913 he joined Jesse Lasky (1880-1958) and Samuel Goldwyn to form the forerunner of Paramount Communications. Their first venture, The Squaw Man (1914), was the first full-length feature film produced in Hollywood, and it established DeMille as a director. He made numerous comedies before creating biblical spectacles such as The Ten Commandments (1923, remade 1956) and The King of Kings (1927). He was known for his flamboyance and his taste for huge casts and extravagant sets. Among his 70 other films are Samson and Delilah (1949) and The Greatest Show on Earth (1952, Academy Award for best picture). He also hosted the popular weekly Lux Radio Theatre (1936-45)
Cecil B. DeMille
a US film producer and director who helped to establish the film industry in Hollywood. He is famous for making epics (=long films about people in the Bible or in history, which used hundreds of actors) . His films include Samson and Delilah (1949) and The Ten Commandments (1956) (1881-1959)
Cecil Blount DeMille
born Aug. 12, 1881, Ashfield, Mass., U.S. died Jan. 21, 1959, Hollywood, Calif. U.S. film director and producer. In 1913 he joined Jesse Lasky (1880-1958) and Samuel Goldwyn to form the forerunner of Paramount Communications. Their first venture, The Squaw Man (1914), was the first full-length feature film produced in Hollywood, and it established DeMille as a director. He made numerous comedies before creating biblical spectacles such as The Ten Commandments (1923, remade 1956) and The King of Kings (1927). He was known for his flamboyance and his taste for huge casts and extravagant sets. Among his 70 other films are Samson and Delilah (1949) and The Greatest Show on Earth (1952, Academy Award for best picture). He also hosted the popular weekly Lux Radio Theatre (1936-45)
Cecil Day-Lewis
born April 27, 1904, Ballintubbert, County Leix, Ire. died May 22, 1972, Hadley Wood, Hertfordshire, Eng. Irish-born British poet. Son of a clergyman, Day-Lewis studied at the University of Oxford and in the 1930s became part of a circle of left-wing poets centred on W.H. Auden, though he later turned to an individual lyricism expressed in traditional forms. His works include translations of Virgil's Georgics (1940), Aeneid (1952), and Eclogues (1963) and the verse collections The Room (1965) and The Whispering Roots (1970). He also wrote the autobiography The Buried Day (1960) and several detective novels under the pseudonym Nicholas Blake. He became poet laureate of England in 1968. He was the father of actor Daniel Day-Lewis
Cecil John Rhodes
born July 5, 1853, Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, Eng. died March 26, 1902, Muizenberg, Cape Colony Financier, statesman, and empire builder of British South Africa. Rhodes grew up in the English countryside and in 1871 was sent to assist his brother in business in South Africa, where he became interested in diamond mining. He founded De Beers Consolidated Mines (1888), and by 1891 his company was mining 90% of the world's diamonds. Seeking expansion to the north and dreaming of building a Cape-to-Cairo railway, he persuaded Britain to establish a protectorate over Bechuanaland (1884), clashing with Boer president Paul Kruger. He obtained digging concessions from Lobengula (1889), but in 1893 Rhodes overran him militarily. At his instigation Britain chartered the British South Africa Co. (1889) and put Rhodes in charge. He extended the company's control to two northern provinces, which were eventually named after him as Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia). Interested in the mineral-rich Transvaal, he plotted to overthrow Kruger (1895); the attempt was botched by Leander Starr Jameson, and Rhodes was forced to resign as prime minister of Cape Colony and head of the British South Africa Co. His last years were marked by disappointment and scandal brought about by the scheming of Princess Radziwi. His will bequeathed most of his fortune to establishing the Rhodes scholarship
Cecil Rhodes
a South African politician, born in the UK, who was Prime Minister of Cape Colony (1890-96) and is famous for his imperialism (=the policy by which rich and powerful countries gain political and economic control over poorer countries) . He also made a lot of money from diamond mines, and he used some of this to set up the Rhodes Scholarships (1853-1902). born July 5, 1853, Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, Eng. died March 26, 1902, Muizenberg, Cape Colony Financier, statesman, and empire builder of British South Africa. Rhodes grew up in the English countryside and in 1871 was sent to assist his brother in business in South Africa, where he became interested in diamond mining. He founded De Beers Consolidated Mines (1888), and by 1891 his company was mining 90% of the world's diamonds. Seeking expansion to the north and dreaming of building a Cape-to-Cairo railway, he persuaded Britain to establish a protectorate over Bechuanaland (1884), clashing with Boer president Paul Kruger. He obtained digging concessions from Lobengula (1889), but in 1893 Rhodes overran him militarily. At his instigation Britain chartered the British South Africa Co. (1889) and put Rhodes in charge. He extended the company's control to two northern provinces, which were eventually named after him as Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia). Interested in the mineral-rich Transvaal, he plotted to overthrow Kruger (1895); the attempt was botched by Leander Starr Jameson, and Rhodes was forced to resign as prime minister of Cape Colony and head of the British South Africa Co. His last years were marked by disappointment and scandal brought about by the scheming of Princess Radziwi. His will bequeathed most of his fortune to establishing the Rhodes scholarship
Cecil Scott Forester
born Aug. 27, 1899, Cairo, Egypt died April 2, 1966, Fullerton, Calif., U.S. British novelist and journalist. Forester abandoned medicine for writing and achieved success with his first novel, Payment Deferred (1926). He is best known as the creator of the naval officer Horatio Hornblower, whose rise from midshipman to admiral and peer during the Napoleonic Wars is told in 12 novels published 1937-67. Many of his novels were adapted into movies, including The African Queen (1935; film, 1951)
Edgar Algernon Robert Gascoyne-Cecil 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood
born Sept. 14, 1864, London, Eng. died Nov. 24, 1958, Tunbridge Wells, Kent British statesman. The son of the marquess of Salisbury, he served during World War I as minister of blockade and as assistant secretary of state for foreign affairs. He was one of the principal draftsmen of the League of Nations covenant in 1919 and, as president of the League of Nations Union (1923-45), one of the League's most loyal workers until it was superseded by the United Nations. In 1937 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize
Robert 1st earl of Salisbury Cecil
born June 1, 1563, London, Eng. died May 24, 1612, Marlborough, Wiltshire English statesman. Trained in statesmanship by his father, William Cecil, Robert entered the House of Commons in 1584. He became acting secretary of state in 1590 and was formally appointed to the post by Elizabeth I in 1596. He succeeded his father as chief minister in 1598 and guided the peaceful succession of Elizabeth by James I, for whom he continued as chief minister from 1603 and lord treasurer from 1608. He negotiated the end of the war with Spain in 1604 and allied England with France
Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil 3rd marquess of Salisbury
born , Feb. 3, 1830, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, Eng. died Aug. 22, 1903, Hatfield British prime minister (1885-86, 1886-92, 1895-1902). He served in Benjamin Disraeli's government as secretary for India (1874-78) and foreign secretary (1878-80), helping to convene the Congress of Berlin. He led the Conservative Party opposition in the House of Lords, then became prime minister on three occasions beginning in 1885, usually serving concurrently as foreign secretary. He opposed alliances, maintained strong national interests, and presided over an expansion of Britain's colonial empire, especially in Africa. He retired in 1902 in favour of his nephew, Arthur James Balfour
Robert Gascoyne-Cecil 1st Viscount Cecil
born Sept. 14, 1864, London, Eng. died Nov. 24, 1958, Tunbridge Wells, Kent British statesman. The son of the marquess of Salisbury, he served during World War I as minister of blockade and as assistant secretary of state for foreign affairs. He was one of the principal draftsmen of the League of Nations covenant in 1919 and, as president of the League of Nations Union (1923-45), one of the League's most loyal workers until it was superseded by the United Nations. In 1937 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize
Sir Cecil Beaton
a British photographer and designer for fashion, theatre, and film. He is famous for his pictures of famous and wealthy people (1904-80). born Jan. 14, 1904, London, Eng. died Jan. 18, 1980, Broadchalke, Salisbury, Wiltshire British photographer and designer. When he received his first camera at age 11, he began making portraits of his sisters. In the 1920s he became staff photographer at Vanity Fair and Vogue. In Beaton's exotic and bizarre portraits, the sitter is only one element of an overall decorative composition dominated by flamboyant backgrounds. His photographs of the siege of Britain were published in Winged Squadrons (1942). After the war he designed costumes and stage sets, including those for the movies Gigi (1958) and My Fair Lady (1964)
Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton
born Jan. 14, 1904, London, Eng. died Jan. 18, 1980, Broadchalke, Salisbury, Wiltshire British photographer and designer. When he received his first camera at age 11, he began making portraits of his sisters. In the 1920s he became staff photographer at Vanity Fair and Vogue. In Beaton's exotic and bizarre portraits, the sitter is only one element of an overall decorative composition dominated by flamboyant backgrounds. His photographs of the siege of Britain were published in Winged Squadrons (1942). After the war he designed costumes and stage sets, including those for the movies Gigi (1958) and My Fair Lady (1964)
William 1st Baron Burghley Cecil
born Sept. 13, 1520, Bourne, Lincolnshire, Eng. died Aug. 5, 1598, London English statesman, principal adviser to Elizabeth I through most of her reign and a master of Renaissance statecraft. Having served as a councillor and cosecretary to Edward VI, he was appointed Elizabeth's sole secretary when she became queen in 1558. A dedicated and skillful adviser to the queen, Cecil was created Baron Burghley in 1571 and appointed lord high treasurer (1572-98). He obtained the trial and execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, thus securing the Protestant succession, and his preparations enabled England to survive the Spanish Armada. But he failed to induce Elizabeth to marry or to reform her church along more Protestant lines
cecil

    الواصلة

    Cec·il

    التركية النطق

    sisıl

    النطق

    /ˈsēsəl/ /ˈsiːsəl/

    علم أصول الكلمات

    () From Latin Caecilius, a Roman family name derived from caecus (“blind”). The surname has absorbed the Old Welsh given name Seisyllt, from Latin Sextilius, from Sextus.

    كلمة اليوم

    beestings
المفضلات