catawba

listen to the pronunciation of catawba
الإنجليزية - الإنجليزية
A Native American people who inhabit the Carolinas

There was a Catawba brave who took some pottery to trade for bows and arrows. This chief had a beautiful daughter, and the Catawba brave fell in love with her, and she likewise fell in love with him. When the Catawba brave left, she asked her father for a bow and arrow. She shot it in the air in the direction the brave went, and then she went to get it. She kept shooting it in the air until she caught up with him.

A reddish American dessert grape
The language of this people
A river in the Carolinas which rises in the Blue Ridge Mountains and flows approximately 220 miles (350 km) before joining the Wateree River and ultimately flowing into the Atlantic. thumb|The path of the Catawba river

Cornwallis finally moved after Morgan's men. Left behind to cover the fords and delay the British, North Carolina general William Lee Davidson and a few men were killed as the British poured across Cowan's Ford. Once the British crossed the Catawba, the Americans had to get past another river, the Yadkin beyond Salisbury.

A member of this people
Common name for the catawba grape, a cultivar of North American vitus labrusca
The Catawba rhododendron (Rhododendron catawbiense)
Original and alternate common name for the various species of catalpa trees
{i} Siouan language spoken by the Catawba people
North American Indian people of South Carolina, U.S. The meaning of the name Catawba, which seems to have been applied after European contact to several small bands of peoples in the region of the Catawba River, is unknown. The peoples first encountered by Hernando de Soto subsisted principally by farming, harvesting corn, beans, squash, and gourds. Fish and birds were also staples of their diet. They traded bowls, baskets, and mats to other native groups and, later, to colonists. Each village was governed by a council presided over by a chief. After contact with European settlers, disease and other factors diminished their numbers rapidly. In the 2000 U.S. census some 1,700 people identified themselves as of sole Catawba descent
{i} member of a North American Inidan tribe of South Carolina that formerly lived along the Catawba River; type of American grapevine; reddish grape produced by this vine; dry white wine made from this grape
A Native American people formerly inhabiting the Carolinas
A alternate common name for the various species of catalpa trees
the Siouan language spoken by the Catawba people
slip-skin reddish American table grape
a member of the Siouan people formerly living in the Carolinas
A light-colored, sprightly American wine from the Catawba grape
the Siouan language spoken by the Catawba people slip-skin reddish American table grape a member of the Siouan people formerly living in the Carolinas
A well known light red variety of American grape
Catawba River
{i} river that rises in North Carolina and flows into South Carolina (USA)
Catawba River
A river rising in the Blue Ridge of western North Carolina and flowing about 402 km (250 mi) generally southward into South Carolina, where it is called the Wateree River. River, southeastern U.S. Rising in North Carolina's Blue Ridge, it flows south into South Carolina, where it becomes the Wateree River. It is 220 mi (350 km) long. With the Wateree, it forms an important source of hydroelectric power for South Carolina
catawba

    الواصلة

    Ca·taw·ba

    التركية النطق

    kıtôbı

    المترادفات

    iswa, issa, esaw

    النطق

    /kəˈtôbə/ /kəˈtɔːbə/

    علم أصول الكلمات

    () From the Catawba word catawba, as the tree was the people's totem.

    كلمة اليوم

    ripsnorter
المفضلات