abram

listen to the pronunciation of abram
الإنجليزية - الإنجليزية
A prophet in the Old Testament; Semitic patriarch, father of the Jewish patriarch Isaac (by his wife Sarah) and the Arabic patriarch Ishmael (by his concubine Hagar). His name was later changed to Abraham

And Abram took Sarai his wife, and Lot his brother's son, and all their substance that they had gathered, and the souls that they had gotten in Haran; and they went forth to go into the land of Canaan; and into the land of Canaan they came.

A male given name
A patronymic surname
A village near Manchester
A habitational surname
naked. (1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue)
Alternative spelling of auburn
{i} early form of the name Abraham appearing in the Book of Genesis (Biblical); male first name (form of Abraham)
A surname
A corruption of auburn
The colour auburn, for example in early folios of the play Coriolanus
Abram cove
A scoundrel

So loathly was he and verminous they scarce could seize and bind him, but when haled before the magistrate he proved to be an abram-cove named Jacques Roulet, who with his brother Jean and a cousin Julien.

Abram men
Alternative form of Abraham men
Abram-man
Variant of Abraham man
Abram S Hewitt
born July 31, 1822, Haverstraw, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 18, 1903, Ringwood, N.J. U.S. industrialist and politician. A graduate of Columbia College (now part of Columbia University) in 1842, he formed an iron-making business with Edward and Peter Cooper in New York City in 1845; he later helped establish the Cooper Union school (1859). During the American Civil War, he produced gun-barrel iron for the government without taking a profit. In 1870 he produced the first commercial-grade steel in the U.S. In 1871 he helped Samuel Tilden oust the "Tweed Ring" (see William Marcy Tweed) from control of the Tammany Hall Democratic organization and the municipal government of New York City. He later served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1875-79, 1881-86). As mayor of New York (1887-88), he initiated major reforms that broke Tammany Hall's influence
Abram Stevens Hewitt
born July 31, 1822, Haverstraw, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 18, 1903, Ringwood, N.J. U.S. industrialist and politician. A graduate of Columbia College (now part of Columbia University) in 1842, he formed an iron-making business with Edward and Peter Cooper in New York City in 1845; he later helped establish the Cooper Union school (1859). During the American Civil War, he produced gun-barrel iron for the government without taking a profit. In 1870 he produced the first commercial-grade steel in the U.S. In 1871 he helped Samuel Tilden oust the "Tweed Ring" (see William Marcy Tweed) from control of the Tammany Hall Democratic organization and the municipal government of New York City. He later served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1875-79, 1881-86). As mayor of New York (1887-88), he initiated major reforms that broke Tammany Hall's influence
sham Abram
To pretend sickness. (1811 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue)
James Abram Garfield
(1831-1881) 20th president of the United States (1881)
James Abram Garfield
born Nov. 19, 1831, near Orange, Ohio, U.S. died Sept. 19, 1881, Elberon, N.J. 20th president of the U.S. (1881). He was the last president born in a log cabin. He attended Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (later Hiram College) at Hiram, Ohio, and graduated (1856) from Williams College. He returned to the Eclectic Institute as a professor of ancient languages and in 1857, at age 25, became the school's president. In the American Civil War he led the 42nd Ohio Volunteers and fought at Shiloh and Chickamauga. He resigned as a major general to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives (1863-80). As a Radical Republican, he sought a firm policy of Reconstruction in the South. In 1876 he served on the Electoral Commission that decided the presidential election between Rutherford B. Hayes and Samuel Tilden. He was House Republican leader from 1876 to 1880, when he was elected to the Senate by the Ohio legislature. At the 1880 Republican nominating convention, the delegates supporting Ulysses S. Grant and James Blaine became deadlocked. On the 36th ballot, Garfield was nominated as a compromise presidential candidate, with Chester Arthur as vice president; they won the election by a narrow margin. His brief term, lasting less than 150 days, was marked by a dispute with Sen. Roscoe Conkling over patronage. On July 2 he was shot at Washington's railroad station by Charles J. Guiteau, a disappointed office seeker. He died on Sept. 19 after 11 weeks of public debate over the ambiguous constitutional conditions for presidential succession (later clarified by the 20th and 25th Amendments)
abram

    الواصلة

    A·bram

    التركية النطق

    ıbräm

    المترادفات

    abraham

    النطق

    /əˈbram/ /əˈbræm/

    علم أصول الكلمات

    () Alteration of auburn

    كلمة اليوم

    maquillage
المفضلات