Leo

listen to the pronunciation of Leo
İngilizce - Türkçe
aslan

O, aslanlarla leoparlar arasındaki farkın ne olduğunu bilmiyor. - He doesn't know what the difference is between lions and leopards.

Aslan iki yaşındayken kükremeye başladı. - Leo started to roar when he was two years old.

Aslan burcu
(Askeri) alçak Dünya yörüngesi (low Earth orbit)
i., astrol. Aslan burcu
{i} Aslan burcu [(Astronomi) ]
{i} aslan takımyıldızı [(Astronomi) ]
Aslan takım yıldızı
birçok papanın adı
Aslan takımyıldızı
leo minor
küçükaslan takımyıldızı
panthera leo
panter
Türkçe - Türkçe
Aslan takımyıldızının Latince adı
İngilizce - İngilizce
The Lyons Electronic Office Computer, an early British computer
Low Earth Orbit
: The zodiac sign for the Lion, covering July 22–August 23
: A constellation of the zodiac, shaped approximately like a lion and containing the bright star Regulus
Someone with a Leo star sign
A male given name, borne by numerous saints and 13 popes
communication satellite system that orbits the Earth at a low altitude (mainly used for cellular telephone communications)
{i} Lion, constellation in the Northern Hemisphere (Astronomy); fifth sign of the zodiac (Astrology); person born under the fifth sign (Astrology); male first name
The zodiac sign for the Lion, covering July 23-August 22
Leo is one of the twelve signs of the zodiac. Its symbol is a lion. People who are born approximately between the 23rd of July and the 22nd of August come under this sign
A Leo is a person whose sign of the zodiac is Leo. known as Leo the Isaurian born 675, Germanicia, Commagene, Syria died June 18, 742, Constantinople Byzantine emperor (717-41), founder of the Isaurian dynasty. A high-ranking military commander, he seized the throne with the help of Arab armies who hoped to subjugate the Byzantine Empire. He then successfully defended Constantinople against the Arabs (717-718). Having crowned his son Constantine V coemperor (720), Leo used his son's marriage to cement an alliance with the Khazars. Victory over the Arabs at Akroïnos (740) was crucial in preventing their conquest of Asia Minor. Leo issued an important legal code, the Ecloga (726). His policy of iconoclasm (730), which banned the use of sacred images in churches, engendered a century of conflict within the empire and further strained relations with the pope in Rome. orig. Vincenzo Gioacchino Pecci born March 2, 1810, Carpineto Romano, Papal States died July 20, 1903, Rome Pope (1878-1903). Born into the Italian nobility, he was ordained a priest in 1837 and entered the diplomatic service of the Papal States. He was appointed bishop of Perugia in 1846 and was named a cardinal in 1853. He was elected pope in 1878, and, despite his advanced age and frail health, he directed the church for a quarter of a century. Like his predecessor, Pius IX, he opposed Freemasonry and secular liberalism, but he brought a new spirit to the papacy by adopting a conciliatory attitude toward civil governments and taking a more positive view of scientific progress. orig. Giovanni de' Medici born Dec. 1, 1475, Florence died Dec. 1, 1521, Rome Pope (1513-21), one of the most extravagant of the Renaissance pontiffs. The second son of Lorenzo de' Medici, he was educated at his father's court in Florence and at the University of Pisa. He was named a cardinal in 1492, and in 1494 he was exiled from Florence by the revolt of Girolamo Savonarola. He returned in 1500 and soon consolidated Medici control of the city. As pope, he became a patron of the arts, accelerating construction of St. Peter's Basilica. He strengthened the papacy's political power in Europe, but his lavish spending depleted his treasury. He discouraged reforms at the fifth Lateran Council, and he responded inadequately to the Reformation, excommunicating Martin Luther in 1521 and failing to address the need for change, a lapse that signaled the end of the unified Western church. (Latin: "Lion") In astronomy, the constellation lying between Cancer and Virgo; in astrology, the fifth sign of the zodiac, governing approximately the period July 23-August
One of the twelve constellations of the zodiac, shaped approximately like a lion and containing the bright star Regulus
Its symbol, a lion, has been associated with the Nemean lion slain by Heracles. The Nemean lion was considered invulnerable because its skin was impervious to arrows, but Heracles battered it to death with a club. Zeus put the lion in the sky as a constellation. Baeck Leo Baekeland Leo Hendrik Caprivi Georg Leo count von Durocher Leo Ernest Esaki Leo Hassler Hans Leo Leo I Saint Leo the Great Leo III Leo the Isaurian Leo IX Saint Leo XIII Leo X Mankiewicz Joseph Leo Szilard Leo Weldon Leo Teagarden Tolstoy Leo
borne by numerous saints and 13 popes
Law enforcement officer
Low-Earth Orbit Satellite Low-Earth Orbit Satellite
Low Earth Orbit Although definitions of LEO vary from source to source, MSL defines LEO as orbits having apogees and perigees below 3000 km The large majority of all satellites are in Low Earth Orbit
Leonardo; the online catalog of items (books, journals, audio-visual materials, etc ) contained in Carrier Library
Low-earth orbit of up to 800 km above the earth This orbit is used by a constellation of satellites to provide a worldwide mobile phone service
– Low Earth Orbit, for satellites that are placed less than 22,300 miles above earth
the fifth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about July 23 to August 22 a zodiacal constellation in northern hemisphere between Cancer and Virgo (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Leo
A northern constellation east of Cancer, containing the bright star Regulus at the end of the handle of the Sickle
Mobile communications satellite between 700 and 2,000 kilometers above the Earth
Low Earth orbit An orbit for satellites that are generally smaller, less powerful and less expensive than those with GSO systems, at an altitude of less than 1,500 kilometres A LEO constellation, usually containing more than 25 satellites, is required to provide continuous global communications coverage, but surveillance, messaging and other services may be operated using one or more satellites
Low Earth Orbit Mobile communications satellite between 700 and 2,000 kilometers above the Earth
Low-earth orbiting (satellites)
A mobile communications satellite between 700 and 2,000 kilometers above the earth
Low-earth orbit of up to 800 km above the earth This orbit is used by a constellation of satellites to provide a world wide mobile phone service
Low-Earth Orbit Satellite
Low-Earth Orbit Satellite System
The Lion, the fifth sign of the zodiac, marked thus [&Leo;] in almanacs
Low Earth Orbit satellite
means law enforcement officer
MSS Mobile-Satellite Service
Low-earth orbit satellite system that offers voice and data services; e g , Iridium, Globalstar The satellites operate in a zone about 913 miles above the earth (Back to top )
Low Earth Orbit -- The first Satellites were launched into this orbit, due to launch vehicle limitations A few thousand to several hundred kilometers altitude
the fifth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about July 23 to August 22
(astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Leo
a zodiacal constellation in northern hemisphere between Cancer and Virgo
Low-Earth Orbit satellite system; uses satellites positioned in low-altitude earth orbits to provide inexpensive, low frequency, low power positioning and two-way messaging services
Leo Minor
A spring constellation of the northern sky, said to resemble a small lion. It lies north of the constellation Leo and south of Ursa Major
Leo Baeck
born May 23, 1873, Lissa, Posen, Prussia died Nov. 2, 1956, London, Eng. Prussian-Polish rabbi, spiritual leader of German Jewry during the Nazi period. After earning his Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Berlin, he served as a rabbi in Silesia, Düsseldorf, and Berlin, becoming the leading liberal Jewish religious thinker of his time. He synthesized Neo-Kantianism and rabbinic ethics in The Essence of Judaism (1905) and considered the Christian gospels as rabbinic literature in The Gospel as a Document of Jewish Religious History (1938). He negotiated with the Nazis to buy time for the German Jews; finally arrested, he was sent to the Theresienstadt concentration camp, where he wrote and lectured on Plato and Immanuel Kant. Liberated in 1945 on the day before he was to be executed, he settled in England
Leo Baeck
(1873-1956) German Jewish theologian and spiritual leader who preached while imprisoned in the Theresienstadt concentration camp
Leo Baekeland
born Nov. 14, 1863, Ghent, Belg. died Feb. 23, 1944, Beacon, N.Y., U.S. Belgian-born U.S. industrial chemist. A teacher of chemistry in Belgium, he immigrated to the U.S. in 1889. He invented Velox, the first commercially successful photographic paper, which could be developed under artificial light, and sold the rights to George Eastman for $1 million in 1899. His search for a substitute for shellac led to the discovery in 1909 of a method of forming a hard thermosetting plastic, which he named Bakelite, produced from formaldehyde and phenol. His discovery helped found the modern plastics industry
Leo Buerger
{i} (1879-1943) Austrian born United States doctor and urologist
Leo Durocher
born July 27, 1905, West Springfield, Mass., U.S. died Oct. 7, 1991, Palm Springs, Calif. U.S. baseball player and manager. Durocher played for various teams from 1928 to 1938, distinguishing himself by his sharp fielding at shortstop. He gained notoriety as the cheeky, contentious manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers (1939-46, 1948); he was suspended from managing for the entire 1947 season for "conduct detrimental to baseball," a vague charge that was based upon Durocher's reputation for gambling and fast living. He managed the New York Giants 1948-55, left to become a commentator, returned to the game as a coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1961-64), and managed the Chicago Cubs (1966-72) and the Houston Astros (1972-73). He is credited with the observation "Nice guys finish last" (what he actually said was, "The nice guys over there are in seventh place")
Leo Ernest Durocher
born July 27, 1905, West Springfield, Mass., U.S. died Oct. 7, 1991, Palm Springs, Calif. U.S. baseball player and manager. Durocher played for various teams from 1928 to 1938, distinguishing himself by his sharp fielding at shortstop. He gained notoriety as the cheeky, contentious manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers (1939-46, 1948); he was suspended from managing for the entire 1947 season for "conduct detrimental to baseball," a vague charge that was based upon Durocher's reputation for gambling and fast living. He managed the New York Giants 1948-55, left to become a commentator, returned to the game as a coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1961-64), and managed the Chicago Cubs (1966-72) and the Houston Astros (1972-73). He is credited with the observation "Nice guys finish last" (what he actually said was, "The nice guys over there are in seventh place")
Leo Esaki
orig. Esaki Reiona born March 12, 1925, saka, Japan Japanese physicist. In 1956 he became chief physicist of the Sony Corp., and in 1960 he was awarded an IBM fellowship for further research in the U.S., subsequently joining IBM's research laboratories in Yorktown, N.Y. He worked intensively on tunneling in semiconductors and constructed the tunnel diode, which found broad applications in computers and other devices. He shared a 1973 Nobel Prize with Ivar Giaever (b. 1929) and Brian Josephson
Leo Hendrik Baekeland
born Nov. 14, 1863, Ghent, Belg. died Feb. 23, 1944, Beacon, N.Y., U.S. Belgian-born U.S. industrial chemist. A teacher of chemistry in Belgium, he immigrated to the U.S. in 1889. He invented Velox, the first commercially successful photographic paper, which could be developed under artificial light, and sold the rights to George Eastman for $1 million in 1899. His search for a substitute for shellac led to the discovery in 1909 of a method of forming a hard thermosetting plastic, which he named Bakelite, produced from formaldehyde and phenol. His discovery helped found the modern plastics industry
Leo I
Pope (440-461). His negotiations with Attila (452) and Genseric the Vandal (455) saved Rome from barbarian invasion
Leo III
Pope (795-816) who crowned Charlemagne emperor (800)
Leo Minor
A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Leo and Ursa Major
Leo Szilard
born Feb. 11, 1898, Budapest, Hung., Austria-Hungary died May 30, 1964, La Jolla, Calif., U.S. Hungarian-born U.S. physicist. He taught at the University of Berlin (1922-33), then fled to England (1934-37) and the U.S., where he worked at the University of Chicago from 1942. In 1929 he established the relation between entropy and transfer of information, and in 1934 he helped develop the first method of separating isotopes of artificial radioactive elements. He helped Enrico Fermi conduct the first sustained nuclear chain reaction and construct the first nuclear reactor. In 1939 he was instrumental in establishing the Manhattan Project, in which he helped develop the atomic bomb. After the first use of the bomb, he promoted the peaceful uses of atomic energy and the control of nuclear weapons, founding the Council for a Livable World. In 1959 he received the Atoms for Peace Award
Leo Tolstoy
Russian Lev Nikolayevich, Count Tolstoy born Sept. 9, 1828, Yasnaya Polyana, Tula province, Russian Empire died Nov. 20, 1910, Astapovo, Ryazan province Russian writer, one of the world's greatest novelists. The scion of prominent aristocrats, Tolstoy spent much of his life at his family estate of Yasnaya Polyana. After a somewhat dissolute youth, he served in the army and traveled in Europe before returning home and starting a school for peasant children. He was already known as a brilliant writer for the short stories in Sevastopol Sketches (1855-56) and the novel The Cossacks (1863) when War and Peace (1865-69) established him as Russia's preeminent novelist. Set during the Napoleonic Wars, it examines the lives of a large group of characters, centring on the partly autobiographical figure of the spiritually questing Pierre. Its structure, with its flawless placement of complex characters in a turbulent historical setting, is regarded as one of the great technical achievements in the history of the Western novel. His other great novel, Anna Karenina (1875-77), focuses on an aristocratic woman who deserts her husband for a lover and on the search for meaning by another autobiographical character, Levin. After its publication Tolstoy underwent a spiritual crisis and turned to a form of Christian anarchism. Advocating simplicity and nonviolence, he devoted himself to social reform. His later works include The Death of Ivan Ilich (1886), often considered the greatest novella in Russian literature, and What Is Art? (1898), which condemns fashionable aestheticism and celebrates art's moral and religious functions. He lived like a peasant on his great estate, practicing a radical asceticism. Finding his marriage unbearable, he departed suddenly for the local railway station, where he contracted a fatal pneumonia in the cold
Leo X
Pope (1513-1521) who concluded a concordat with France (1516) and excommunicated Martin Luther (1521)
Leo count von Caprivi
born Feb. 24, 1831, Berlin-Charlottenburg, Prussia died Feb. 6, 1899, near Crossen-an-der-Oder, Ger. German soldier and politician. A distinguished soldier, he served as chief of the admiralty (1883-88). He succeeded Otto von Bismarck as Germany's imperial chancellor (1890-94) and Prussian minister president (1890-92). His achievements included an Anglo-German agreement concerning spheres of influence in Africa, commercial treaties with Austria, Romania, and other states, and the reorganization of the German army
leo i
the pope who extended the authority of the papacy to the west and persuaded Attila not to attack Rome (440-461)
leo iii
the pope who in 800 crowned Charlemagne emperor of the Romans (750-816)
leo x
the pope who excommunicated Martin Luther and who in 1521 bestowed on Henry VIII the title of Defender of the Faith (1475-1521)
Panthera leo
a taxonomic species, within genus Panthera - the lion
Count Leo Tolstoy
a Russian writer famous for his long novels War and Peace and Anna Karenina (1828-1910)
Georg Leo count von Caprivi
born Feb. 24, 1831, Berlin-Charlottenburg, Prussia died Feb. 6, 1899, near Crossen-an-der-Oder, Ger. German soldier and politician. A distinguished soldier, he served as chief of the admiralty (1883-88). He succeeded Otto von Bismarck as Germany's imperial chancellor (1890-94) and Prussian minister president (1890-92). His achievements included an Anglo-German agreement concerning spheres of influence in Africa, commercial treaties with Austria, Romania, and other states, and the reorganization of the German army
Hans Leo Hassler
born Oct. 26, 1564, Nürnberg died June 8, 1612, Frankfurt am Main German composer and organist. Born into a family of organists, he studied with Andrea and Giovanni Gabrieli in Venice. He served as chamber organist to the Fugger family of Augsburg (1586- 1600). His compositions became widely known and were granted copyright protection by the emperor in 1591. A Protestant, he eventually left Catholic Augsburg to take posts in Nürnberg, Ulm, and Dresden. He is best known for his sacred Latin choral music, including masses, psalms, and motets, but he also composed Italian madrigals, German part-songs (several became Protestant hymns), and instrumental music
Joseph Leo Mankiewicz
born Feb. 11, 1909, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., U.S. died Feb. 5, 1993, Mount Kisco, N.Y. U.S. film director, producer, and screenwriter. He wrote scripts for Paramount from 1929 and later produced movies such as The Philadelphia Story (1940) and Woman of the Year (1942). Known for his witty, urbane dialogue and memorable characters, he wrote and directed films such as A Letter to Three Wives (1949, Academy Awards for best director and screenplay), All About Eve (1950, Academy Awards for best picture, director, and screenplay), and The Barefoot Contessa (1954), and directed Julius Caesar (1953), Suddenly Last Summer (1959), and the disastrously expensive Cleopatra (1963). His older brother, Herman (1897-1953), was a screenwriter and a famous wit, best remembered as the principal author of Citizen Kane (1941, Academy Award)
Saint Leo I
known as Leo the Great born 4th century, Tuscany? died Nov. 10, 461, Rome; Western feast day November 10, Eastern feast day February 18 Pope (440-461). He was a champion of orthodoxy and a Doctor of the Church. When the monk Eutyches of Constantinople asserted that Jesus Christ had only a single divine nature, Leo wrote the Tome, which established the coexistence of Christ's human and divine natures. Leo's teachings were embraced by the Council of Chalcedon (451), which also accepted his teaching as the "voice of Peter." Leo dealt capably with the invasions of barbaric tribes, persuading the Huns not to attack Rome (452) and the Vandals not to sack the city (455). Leo was also an exponent of the precept of papal primacy, and his personal example and letters and sermons contributed greatly to the growth of papal authority
Saint Leo IX
orig. Bruno, count von Egisheim und Dagsburg born 1002, Egisheim, Alsace, Upper Lorraine died April 19, 1054, Rome; feast day April 19 Pope (1049-54). He was consecrated bishop of Toul in 1027. He was named pope by Emperor Henry III but insisted on election by the clergy and people of Rome. His efforts to strengthen the papacy and eradicate clerical marriage and simony laid the foundation for the Gregorian reform movement. His assertion of papal primacy and his military campaign against the Normans in Sicily (1053) alienated the Eastern church. His representatives excommunicated the patriarch of Constantinople. Though Leo had already died, their act triggered the Schism of 1054
Leo

    Heceleme

    Le·o

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    liō

    Eş anlamlılar

    leonian

    Zıt anlamlılar

    aquarius

    Telaffuz

    /ˈlēō/ /ˈliːoʊ/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'lE-(")O ] (noun.) Abbreviation of Lyons Electronic Office Computer

    Günün kelimesi

    spall