oxford

listen to the pronunciation of oxford
İngilizce - Türkçe

oxford teriminin İngilizce Türkçe sözlükte anlamı

(isim) Oxford
bağlı erkek ayakkabıs
{i} Oxford Oxford Üniversitesi İngilizce konuşulan dünyanın en eski üniversitesidir. O, 1096 yılında kuruldu. - The University of Oxford is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. It was established since 1096.
iskarpin
oxford unit
(Tıp) oxford ünite
İngilizce - İngilizce

oxford teriminin İngilizce İngilizce sözlükte anlamı

A city in England famous for its university
Oxford University
An Oxford Dictionary
A variety of shoe, typically made of heavy leather; also known as a balmoral
A shoe of a particular sort
Alternative capitalization of Oxford. (cloth)
English courtier and poet who is believed by some to have written Shakespeare's plays. ancient Oxonia City and administrative district (pop., 2001: 134,248), county seat of Oxfordshire, England. Situated on the River Thames, the town is best known for the University of Oxford. First occupied in Saxon times as a fording point, it became a burg, built to defend the northern frontier of Wessex from Danish attack; it was first mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of AD 912. Little remains of the town's Norman period of occupation. Oxford is generally known as the "City of Spires" because of its skyline of Gothic towers and steeples. Most of these 15th-17th-century buildings belong to the university. The city was the Royalist headquarters in the English Civil Wars. Its modern economy is varied and includes, in addition to educational services, printing and publishing industries and automobile manufacturing. Asquith Herbert Henry 1st earl of Oxford and Asquith Harley Robert 1st earl of Oxford Oxford English Dictionary The Oxford movement Oxford Edward de Vere 17th earl of Oxford Provisions of Oxford University of
{i} city in England; renowned university in England; name of a number of cities in the USA (e.g. Oxford, Mississippi)
Any low-cut shoe that is held to the foot by means of a lace or other adjustment
Founded early in the twelfth century, Oxford University and its rival, Cambridge University, are the two oldest and most revered universities of Great Britain
A modified plain or weave Can be striped or checked by using groups of various colored yarn
a low shoe laced over the instep a city in southern England northwest of London; site of Oxford University a university town in northern Mississippi; home of William Faulkner
{i} low shoe that laces over the instep
Of or pertaining to the city or university of Oxford, England
Soft, somewhat porous and rather stout cotton shirting weave gives a silklike finish, also made from spun rayon, acetate, and other man-made fibers Oxford also means a woolen or worsted fabric with a grayish cast
‑ Group of cotton fabrics made with modified plain of basket weave
A fine, soft, lightweight woven cotton or blended with manufactured fibers in a 2 x 1 basket weave variation of the plain weave construction The fabric is used primarily in shirtings Return to Index
a low shoe laced over the instep
a university in England
A rayon or cotton fabric in plain, twill, or basket weave constructed on a pattern of two fine yarns woven as one in the warp and one loosely twisted yarn woven in the weft
a city in southern England northwest of London; site of Oxford University
A type of fabric where the fibers are either cotton or blended man made fibers
Yes there was a ford here once and I suppose oxen probably did cross it See Oxford city coat of arms for a picture
A type of fabric where the fibers are either cotton or blended man-made fibers Slash Pockets A pocket that has to be entered through a slash on the outside of the garment The pocket pouch is suspended from and attached to the slash
An actual city in north-central Mississippi, about seventy-five miles south-southeast of Memphis, Tennessee, the county seat of Lafayette County and home of the University of Mississippi ("Ole Miss") Oxford also happens to be the home, for most of his life, of William Faulkner The city is the most obvious real-life model for his fictional town of Jefferson, seat of Yoknapatawpha County; in the fictional realm, however, Oxford is about forty miles away from Jefferson in an unspecified direction Oxford appears in its own right in several of Faulkner's works, generally as the location of Ole Miss, most notably in Sanctuary and Absalom, Absalom!
a university town in northern Mississippi; home of William Faulkner
Oxford blue
A dark blue colour Oxford blue colour:.
Oxford blue
Of a dark blue colour
Oxford comma
A serial comma
Oxford commas
plural form of Oxford comma
Oxford movement
A group of clerical Oxford dons that tried to link the Anglican Church more closely to its Roman Catholic roots
Oxford shoes
plural form of Oxford shoe
Oxford spelling
English spelling as practiced by Oxford publications, this being the usual British spelling but with the letter z used in the suffixes -ize and -ization It was decided to adopt the “Oxford” spelling conventions preferred in most British English academic publications, conventions which are most comfortable for an international readership.
Oxford spellings
plural form of Oxford spelling
Oxford Circus
the place in central London where Regent Street and Oxford Street cross, and also the name of the underground station there. It is one of the busiest places in London, and is always full of people going shopping
Oxford English Dictionary
OED a very large dictionary of English, started in the 1880s, which is famous for its completeness and for its explanations of the origins of words and their history. It is available either as a book in several large volumes, or as a CD-rom
Oxford Street
one of the main streets of central London, famous for its shops and for being very busy
Oxford blue
{i} (British) dark blue, blue color adopted as the color of Oxford University; sportsman who has represented Oxford University in a sporting competition
Oxford gray
medium to dark gray
Oxford movement
A movement within the Church of England, originating at Oxford University in 1833, that sought to link the Anglican Church more closely to the Roman Catholic Church. a group that was formed in Oxford in the mid-19th century, which tried to bring some of the ceremonies and beliefs of the Catholic religion into the Church of England. or Tractarian movement (1833-45) Movement within the Church of England that aimed to emphasize the church's Catholic inheritance as a source of legitimacy and deeper spirituality. Its main intent was to defend the Church of England as a divine institution against the threats of liberal theology, rationalism, and government interference. Though some in the movement (notably John Henry Newman and Henry E. Manning) ended up converting to Catholicism, most did not. Their concern for a higher standard of worship influenced not only the Church of England but also other British Protestant sects. The movement was also instrumental in the establishment of Anglican monasteries and convents
Oxford shoes
low shoes that lace over the instep
oxford blue
{s} of a dark blue color
oxford cloth
cotton cloth made in a basket weave (often used to make button-up shirts)
oxford english
the dialect of English spoken at Oxford University and regarded by many as affected and pretentious
oxford english dictionary
an unabridged dictionary constructed on historical principles
oxford gray
A dark gray
oxford movement
19th-century movement in the Church of England opposing liberal tendencies
oxford university
a university in England
oxford-gray
dark gray
Edward de Vere 17th earl of Oxford
orig. Edward de Vere born April 12, 1550, Castle Hedingham, Essex, Eng. died June 24, 1604, Newington, Middlesex English lyric poet. A brilliantly gifted linguist and one of the most dashing figures of his time, Oxford was also reckless, hot-tempered, and disastrously spendthrift. He was the patron of an acting company, Oxford's Men, and possibly later of the Lord Chamberlain's Men (as hereditary Lord Great Chamberlain of England), as well as of such writers as John Lyly and Edmund Spenser. He wrote highly praised poems and plays in his earlier years, though none of the plays are known to have survived. A 1920 book by J. Thomas Looney made Oxford the leading candidate, next to William Shakespeare himself, for the authorship of Shakespeare's plays, a theory supported by the coincidence that Oxford's literary output apparently ceased just before Shakespeare's work began to appear. A major difficulty in the Oxfordian theory, however, is his death date (1604), because, according to standard chronology, 14 of Shakespeare's plays, including many of the most important ones, were apparently written after that time. The debate, however, remained lively into the 21st century
H H 1st earl of Oxford and Asquith Asquith
born Sept. 12, 1852, Morley, Yorkshire, Eng. died Feb. 15, 1928, Sutton Courtenay, Berkshire British politician and prime minister (1908-16). Elected to the House of Commons in 1886, he served as home secretary (1892-95). A leader of the Liberal Party, he became prime minister in 1908. His plan to limit the powers of the House of Lords was enacted by the Parliament Act of 1911. He led Britain in the early years of World War I, but domestic crises combined with British losses in the war led to widespread dissatisfaction. He resigned in 1916 but remained leader of his party until 1926
Herbert Henry 1st earl of Oxford and Asquith Asquith
born Sept. 12, 1852, Morley, Yorkshire, Eng. died Feb. 15, 1928, Sutton Courtenay, Berkshire British politician and prime minister (1908-16). Elected to the House of Commons in 1886, he served as home secretary (1892-95). A leader of the Liberal Party, he became prime minister in 1908. His plan to limit the powers of the House of Lords was enacted by the Parliament Act of 1911. He led Britain in the early years of World War I, but domestic crises combined with British losses in the war led to widespread dissatisfaction. He resigned in 1916 but remained leader of his party until 1926
Provisions of Oxford
(1258) Plan of reform accepted by Henry III of England. On the verge of bankruptcy, Henry asked Parliament for a grant of revenue and agreed in return to a program of reform drafted by a royal commission. Regarded as England's first written constitution, the Provisions placed the government under the direction of the king and a 15-member baronial council, provided for Parliament to meet three times a year, and reformed local administration. They were annulled by the Dictum of Kenilworth (1266)
Robert 1st earl of Oxford Harley
born Dec. 5, 1661, London, Eng. died May 21, 1724, London English politician. Elected to Parliament in 1688, he led a coalition of Whigs and moderate Tories. He was speaker of the House of Commons (1701-05) and secretary of state (1704-08). A favourite of Queen Anne, he changed his politics to ally with the Tories. He became chancellor of the Exchequer and head of the Tory ministry in 1710. Created earl of Oxford (1711) and lord treasurer, he secured a reasonable peace at the Peace of Utrecht (1713). He was exiled from power by the Hanoverian succession and imprisoned (1715-17), after which he retired from politics
The Oxford English Dictionary
Definitive historical dictionary of the English language. It was conceived by London's Philological Society in 1857, and sustained editorial work began in 1879 under James Murray. Published in 10 volumes between 1884 and 1928, it first appeared under its current name in 1933. Its definitions are arranged mostly in order of historical occurrence and illustrated with dated quotations from English-language literature and records. Its second edition was published in 20 volumes in 1989
University of Oxford
Autonomous university at Oxford, Oxfordshire, England. It was founded in the 12th century and modeled on the University of Paris, with initial faculties of theology, law, medicine, and the liberal arts. Of the earliest colleges, University College was founded in 1249, Balliol 1263, and Merton in 1264. Early scholars of note include Roger Bacon, John Duns Scotus, William of Ockham, and John Wycliffe. In the Renaissance, Desiderius Erasmus and St. Thomas More helped enhance its already considerable reputation. By then faculties of physical science, political science, and other fields had been added. The first women's college, Lady Margaret Hall, was established in 1878. There are 32 other colleges and collegial institutions. Oxford houses the Bodleian Library and the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology. Oxford University Press (1478) is the world's oldest, largest, and most famous university publisher. Oxford has been associated with many of the greatest names in British history
oxfords
A dress-casual to formal style of lace-up shoes
saddle oxford
an oxford with a saddle of contrasting color
Türkçe - İngilizce

oxford teriminin Türkçe İngilizce sözlükte anlamı

oxford The University of Oxford is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. It was established since 1096. - Oxford Üniversitesi İngilizce konuşulan dünyanın en eski üniversitesidir. O, 1096 yılında kuruldu.
oxonian
Oxford ve cambridge üniversiteleri
Oxbridge
oxford ünite
(Tıp) oxford unit
oxford

    Heceleme

    Ox·ford

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    äksfırd

    Telaffuz

    /ˈäksfərd/ /ˈɑːksfɜrd/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'äks-f&rd ] (noun.) 1886. Oxenaforda (“oxen ford”)

    Günün kelimesi

    torrid