diaspora

listen to the pronunciation of diaspora
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} yahudilerin sürgünden sonra dünyaya yayılması
{i} sürgünden sonra dağılmış yahudi
Türkçe - Türkçe
İngilizce - İngilizce
The Jews so dispersed, taken collectively
A similar dispersion
The dispersion of the Jews from the land of Israel
Any similar dispersion

The African diaspora caused a melding of cultures, both African cultures and Western ones, in many places.

Any dispersion of an originally homogeneous entity, such as a language or culture

he diaspora of English into several mutually incomprehensible languages.

The regions where such a dispersed group (especially the Jews) resides, taken collectively

Jews in the diaspora often have a different perspective of anti-Semitism from Israeli Jews.

A group so dispersed, especially Jews outside of the land of Israel
The dispersion of the Jews among the Gentiles after the Captivity
The Jews that were scattered among the Gentiles after Babylonian captivity
A dispersion of an originally homogeneous entity, such as a language or culture: "the diaspora of English into several mutually incomprehensible languages" (Randolph Quirk)
A dispersion of a group of people from their native land, commonly used in reference to the Jews
{i} Jewish exile, dispersion of the Jews to countries outside of Israel among the Gentiles (after the Babylonian captivity); term used today for the community of Jews living outside of Israel
The worldwide Jewish dispensation after the destruction of the second Temple in 70 C E Refers to all Jews living outside of Israel also known as the "exile " In Hebrew, the word for exile is "galut "
forced dispersal of the Jews from their homeland in Palestine, first by the Chaldeans in 586 BCE and by the Romans in 70 CE; the establishment of Jewish communities throughout the Roman Empire and later throughout Europe
Greek for "dispersion," most commonly used of Jews living outside the land of Israel anytime after the Babylonian Exile, but also used by other groups (e g , the Palestinians in an ironic reference to their dispossession by Jews)
Thereafter, the chief centres of Judaism shifted from country to country (e.g., Babylonia, Persia, Spain, France, Germany, Poland, Russia, and the U.S.), and Jewish communities gradually adopted distinctive languages, rituals, and cultures, some submerging themselves in non-Jewish environments more completely than others. While some lived in peace, others became victims of violent anti-Semitism. While the vast majority of Orthodox Jews have supported Zionism, some Orthodox Jews go so far as to oppose the modern State of Israel on the grounds that it is a godless and secular state defying God's will to send his messiah at the time he has preordained
Those Jews living outside the land of Israel
Refers to the Jews living in scattered communities outside Eretz Yisrael (the Land of Israel) during and after the Babylonian Captivity (sixth century B C ) and, especially, after the dispersion of the Jews from the region after the destruction of the Temple by the Romans in A D 70 and the Bar-Kokhba War in A D 132- 35 In modern times the word refers to the Jews living outside Palestine or present-day Israel When the word is applied--usually lowercased--to non-Jews, such as the Palestinian Arab refugees, the word describes the situation of the people of one country dispersed into other countries
" applied collectively: (a) To those Jews who, after the Exile, were scattered through the Old World, and afterwards to Jewish Christians living among heathen
People who come from a particular nation, or whose ancestors came from it, but who now live in many different parts of the world are sometimes referred to as the diaspora. the history of peoples from the African diaspora. Hebrew Galut ("Exile") (Greek; "Dispersion") The dispersion of Jews among the Gentiles after the Babylonian Exile (586 BC), or the aggregate of Jews outside Palestine or present-day Israel. The term also carries religious, philosophical, political, and eschatological connotations, inasmuch as the Jews perceive a special relationship between the land of Israel and themselves. Interpretations of this relationship range from the messianic hope of traditional Judaism for the eventual "ingathering of the exiles" to the view of Reform Judaism that the dispersal of the Jews was providentially arranged by God to foster monotheism throughout the world. Historically, Diaspora Jews outnumbered the Jews in Palestine even before the destruction of Jerusalem in AD
Cf
Jewish dispersion or exile from the Land of Israel Also the term used to refer to Jews and Jewish communities living worldwide beyond the borders of the State of Israel
The dispersion of the Jews
the movement, migration or scattering of people from their original homelands
the dispersion of the Jews outside Israel; from the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem in 587-86 BC when they were exiled to Babylonia up to the present time
(n) - A historical dispersion of a group of people deriving from similar origins, i e the African Diaspora includes African Americans, Africans, Caribbeans, Afro-Russians, Black Brazilians, Afro Latinos etc
Exile The dwelling of Jews outside the land of Israel
"Dispersion
(b) By extension, to Christians isolated from their own communion, as among the Moravians to those living, usually as missionaries, outside of the parent congregation
Jews who lived outside Israel after the Exile, especially around the Mediterranean Basin They mainly spoke Greek and the Septuagint was their Bible
James i
the body of Jews (or Jewish communities) outside Palestine or modern Israel
Describes the scattering of the Jews after the Fall of Jerusalem
areas of the world outside of the Land of Israel
(Lit the scattering of seed) the "scattering" of the Jewish people across the earth
the dispersion or spreading of something that was originally localized (as a people or language or culture) the dispersion of the Jews outside Israel; from the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem in 587-86 BC when they were exiled to Babylonia up to the present time the body of Jews (or Jewish communities) outside Palestine or modern Israel
{i} dispersion of any people from their ancestral homeland
The forced exiles of the Jewish people from Palestine by the Babylonians in the sixth century BCE and by the Roman Empire in the middle of the 2nd century CE
Jewish communities outside of Israel
The offspring of an area who have spread to many lands
Jews living in Israel
(Greek for "scattering") The technical term for the dispersion of the Jewish people, a process which began after defeats in 721 and 587 B C E and resulted in the growth of sizable Jewish communities outside Palestine; the terms diasora and dispersion are often used to refer to the Jewish communities living among the gentiles outside the "holy land" of Canaan/Israel/Palestine See Chapter 16
the Dispersion, the scattering of the Jews into excile to the four corners of the earth However it is starting to end, with the Jews returning to Israel
Lit
applied collectively: (a) To those Jews who, after the Exile, were scattered through the Old World, and afterwards to Jewish Christians living among heathen
the dispersion or spreading of something that was originally localized (as a people or language or culture)
Diaspora Jewry
Jews who live outside of the land of Israel
diaspora