English - Turkish

  1. ilgeç isim
  2. edat isim
  3. Edatların (preposıtıons)
  4. edat belirterek (prepositionally)

English - English

  1. : A closed class of non-inflecting words typically employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word: a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word
  2. A proposition; an exposition; a discourse - "He made a long preposition and oration."
  3. To place in a location before some other event occurs - "It is important to preposition the material before turning on the machine."
  4. a function word that combines with a noun or pronoun or noun phrase to form a prepositional phrase that can have an adverbial or adjectival relation to some other word
  5. A closed class of non-inflecting words typically employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; - so called because it is usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running. Prepositions are a heterogeneous class of words, with fuzzy boundaries that tend to overlap with other categories (like verbs, nouns, and adjectives)
  6. pg 17, par 2
  7. (linguistics) the placing of one linguistic element before another (as placing a modifier before the word it modifies in a sentence or placing an affix before the base to which it is attached)
  8. one of a group of words that precedes a noun or pronoun and indicates direction, position, placement, duration, or another kind of connection to the other words in the sentence; (e g , about, above, through, under, with)one of a group of words that precedes a noun or pronoun and indicates direction, position, placement, duration, or another kind of connection to the other words in the sentence; (e g , about, above, through, under, with)
  9. A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running
  10. part of speech that serves to express the relationship between two words (Grammar) isim
  11. a word which governs and typically precedes a noun or a pronoun
  12. a word that combines with a noun, pronoun, or noun equivalent to form a phrase that typically has an adverbial, adjectival, or substantival relation to some other word In English, a preposition is generally considered a bad thing to end a sentence with
  13. part of speech that shows relationship between a noun or pronoun and another word, as in: The word for is a preposition that originally meant on account of, instead of, or because of
  14. A word that often indicates time or place (at, on, in, etc ), often before a noun group: Paul hit the ball over the fence
  15. a word denoting the situation of an idea or a thing in space or time
  16. A conditional variable reference may include a preposition (also known as a prefix) that is included in the sentence before the value of the variable but only if the variable is not empty In the following conditional variable reference, the preposition is "and ": "<and [PO]>" See default preposition
  17. a small word such as at, over, by and with Prepositions are usually attached to a noun or noun phrase, showing the position or relationship of one thing to another, for example, he arrived on a bike/ by car/ over an hour ago Once a prepositional phrase is formed, it usually does the work of an adverb or adjective Prepositions can also be found in phrasal verbs, e g Get up! Come on! English also has one postposition: ago
  18. A preposition is a word such as `by', `for', `into', or `with' which usually has a noun group as its object. There is nothing in the rules of grammar to suggest that ending a sentence with a preposition is wrong. a word that is used before a noun, pronoun, or gerund to show place, time, direction etc. In the phrase 'the trees in the park', 'in' is a preposition (praepositio, from praeponere )
  19. prep (preposition.)
  20. In a prepositional manner (prepositionally)
  21. As a preposition (prepositionally)
  22. as a preposition; through the use of a preposition (prepositionally)
  23. third-person singular of preposition (prepositions)
  24. plural of preposition (prepositions)

Turkish - English

  1. prep

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About This Word

    Etymology: [ "pre-p&-zi-sh&n ] (noun.) 14th century. From Latin praepositio, from praeponere (to place before); prae (before) + ponere (to put, place); compare French préposition. (See position, and compare provost.) So called because it is usually placed before the word with which it is phrased, as in a bridge of iron, he comes from town, it is good for food, he escaped by running.
    Word of the day: apocrypha